• Consumer behavior,  Marketing

    Marketing lessons from Matthew McConaughey

    Did you hear that? It was the collective sigh of relief South Floridians breathed upon learning they were out of the forecast cone for Hurricane Dorian. The uncertain path of sloth-like storm relegated many to 48+ hours of hunkering down in our homes and streaming countless videos while gorging ourselves on the “survival snacks” we bought in preparation for the worst possible outcome. (Thankfully, we were very fortunate this time!) As for myself, I cozied up with a glass of wine and selected “The Lincoln Lawyer” for my viewing pleasure. In it, Matthew McConaughey plays a slick yet likable criminal defense attorney in L.A. named Mick Haller. The intermittent flash…

  • Analytics,  Consumer behavior,  Marketing

    Why we can’t believe every single thing Simon says

    Simon Sinek’s viral TED talk, “Start with the Why” is, at first glance, very impressive. In ten minutes, he offers a very simplistic answer to a complex question which marketers have wrestled with for decades – why do consumers behave the way they do? Throughout the video, Sinek repeatedly insists that “People don’t buy what you do, they buy why you do it.” He asserts the reason is biological, and that different parts of our brains take over when making decisions, and that we tend to go with our gut reactions when deciding on a purchase. There are several problems with this theory.

  • Consumer behavior,  Marketing

    Has the flywheel replaced the funnel?

    During her talk at the Digital Branding Analytics Miami 2019 Conference (#DBAMiami), on May 11, 2019, Kathy Mayor spoke about the concept of the marketing flywheel. She elaborated on how BoxyCharm capitalizes on this notion in the relationship between its brands, influencers, and subscribers. Much like the mechanical flywheels used in ancient potter’s wheels and in the steam engines of the Industrial Revolution, the marketing flywheel uses rotational energy to increase efficiency. The flywheel also has to be self-perpetuating.

  • Beauty,  Consumer behavior,  Marketing Communication

    The end is near(er): a sign of the times for marketers

    As marketers, we know we should begin every campaign with the end in mind. You want to have an end goal established so you know whether or not your marketing efforts were successful. At the Digital Branding Analytics Miami 2019 Conference (#DBAMiami), Britney Muller challenged me to think about a different end in mind – how people consume your content. For instance, if your product is a new line of cosmetics, there’s a good chance your target audience will want to see a tutorial on how to use them. In that case, you wouldn’t recommend the company utilize a LinkedIn article to introduce their product line when watching YouTube videos…

  • Branding,  Consumer behavior,  Marketing

    Why customer relationships should matter to marketers

    Consumer behavior dictates marketing strategies. It really is as simple as that. Fortunately for marketers, science shows that people are easily influenced at the subconscious level. With a little work, they can be persuaded at the conscious level if you can speak to their immediate pain points at the appropriate time in the customer’s journey. What companies do after they obtain their customers is even more important than the measures they took to reel them in. According to Rightnow Technologies, 73% of customers leave a brand because they are dissatisfied with customer service.

  • Consumer behavior,  Marketing,  Marketing Communication

    People are strange, when you’re a marketer

    It’s interesting to reflect on how the price of an individual’s privacy has plummeted over the years. I remember when Facebook first came out and users were reticent to give up their date of birth so they could register to be part of the social site. (I, for one, initially gave them a fictitious birthday. Later I corrected it when I realized it might be nice to have hundreds of ‘friends’ post on my wall and wish me a happy birthday.) Jump forward ten years, and we reflexively grant permissions and quickly click through user agreements without reading them, and without a second thought, to join online communities with our…

  • Advertising,  Consumer behavior,  Marketing Communication

    Is the ‘Hook’ harmful?

    In his book, Hooked, Nir Eyal explains the Hook Model – a formula he developed to explain why users of particular products feel compelled to keep coming back for more. The model consists of four progressive steps: trigger, action, variable reward and investment. It’s hard to think about the Hook Model without social media coming to mind. For many people, checking their social media accounts, such as Facebook and Instagram, have become as reflexive an activity as turning on the lights upon entering a room. While some experts say this addiction to online interaction is harmless, others refer to it as “digital heroin.”  Simon Sinek goes so far as to…

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